How to Design a Target Operating Model – Part 2

In my last article, I talked about some of the key aspects you must consider when defining a target operating model. In this follow up piece I have delved a little deeper and will look at how TOM initiatives can vary across different types of businesses; from large corporates to start-ups and government organisations.

[GUEST BLOG] How to design a Target Operating Model that delivers tangible outcomes

The term Target Operating Model (or TOM) has been used a lot in many of the organisations that I have worked for all around the world over the years. Many 100s of millions of dollars in business change budget has been invested in these projects along with many 1000s of people, man hours and resources.

Having been involved in numerous initiatives, I’ve seen all manner of possible outcomes. Some have succeeded in delivering very beneficial outcomes for their organisations. Some have failed to deliver anything. There can be many reasons for this; they couldn’t raise the budget, they couldn’t get the buy-in needed from stakeholders, or they were based on the wrong motivations and outcomes to begin with. With this background in mind, I thought I’d share some insights from my experience around this discipline and try to answer to very important questions:

  • What is the Operating Model?
  • What is a Target Operating Model?

I will also describe how an organisation can really reap the benefits of a successful business transformation programme, or project, that is designed to deliver a Target Operating Model.

Supporting the CIO – Changes, Challenges and the role of Business Architecture

Many C-Level executives are now facing a situation where the ‘traditional’ aspects of their role are being reshaped, or in some cases undergoing wholesale changes. From a CIO perspective, one of the fundamental challenges being faced is that the business is going direct to vendors to procure technology solutions for their business. A Logicalis survey reported recently that 31% of CIOs were bypassed on numerous occasions in technology purchases and over 90% were bypassed at least some of the time(1).

So how can a CIO maintain their influence in today’s businesses?

Big Bash, Australia Open, Grand Prix, and the importance of Big Data.

Every year in Melbourne, January sparks the start of a series of sporting events that keep us entertained right the way through to March. From the end of December and throughout January we have had the luxury of an action packed schedule of Big Bash (20/20) cricket, the Australian Open tennis and after a bit of a lull in February, there is the Australian Grand Prix to look forward to in March.

Whilst the sporting action continues to provide the spectator with excitement, enjoyment and entertainment, the role of analytics and data science in these events continues to grow with each edition of these great events.

“We don’t rise to the level of our expectations; we fall to the level of our training”

While individuals may have different innate talents, the world’s most successful people have always been those who continually enhance their skills and develop instincts through countless hours of training.

Think about it this way, you’re not going to be able to run a marathon on sheer optimism alone — you’re going to have to make sacrifices, invest in new tools and seek out proper guidance and training to ensure you’ll make it to the finish line. The same goes for professional development.

How are you expecting to secure that promotion, ace that big project or become a respected thought leader in your field if you’re not constantly pushing the boundaries and making a proactive effort to widen your knowledge base?

Data Analytics: The fine line between success and failure in the Data-driven Economy

Trying to understand how you can integrate a data-driven vision into your strategic agenda? Or perhaps you understand the need for a data-driven vision but need some tools to successfully implement it in your organisation. In this article, I will closely examine 5 core factors for an organisation’s success or failure in the data-driven economy, some of which you may find surprising.

[GUEST BLOG] Design Thinking & Knowledge Management

A couple of weeks ago I participated in a “Design in Business” course run by Enterprise Architects , co-created with DesignChain and facilitated by the inimitable Helen Palmer.

I had previously undertaken some reading in Design Thinking and started a MOOC on the subject which I didn’t complete, so I wasn’t going in completely blind but I wanted to see how this (concept, framework, method) would assist in my role as a knowledge manager. I think I came out with so much more…

How To Make A Great Coffee… And Business Architecture

A great cup of coffee might seem like an easy every day item, but have you ever truly considered what has to happen to make that coffee? The beans need to be beautifully roasted, they are ground to the perfect consistency, the milk is steamed until it’s silky and smooth, the crema is flowing and then the barista expertly combines them to give you a delicious mouthful of caffeine. Get even one of these elements wrong and suddenly the whole coffee experience is lost.

WHITEPAPER: Experience Architecture

We have entered an era where customer experience is not simply defined by the user interface of self-serve mobile applications, but will be defined as a lifetime brand experience reflecting a corporations brand promise. We will see an intrinsic link between corporate vision, brand promise and a service portfolio that reflects the promise. Critically though it is not just the externally facing service portfolio that must be considered, as employee experience and the supporting employee service portfolio is now equally crucial.

A fusion of business, design and technology planning is required to realise this promise. We term this Experience Architecture and Enterprise Architects / FromHereOn* have published a whitepaper exploring how the fusion of Design Thinking and Enterprise Architecture is an essential path.

Birthing an Industry Standard for Higher Education

Have you ever wondered how industry standard reference models come to be? At Enterprise Architects and FromHereOn we embrace and promote the use of reference models in jump starting the strategy and architecture efforts of our clients. We have adopted and adapted the likes of SCOR (supply chain), APQC (business process), BIAN (banking), EMMM™ (mining) amongst others in the interests of driving a consistent business definition across clients and solutions in given sectors.